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Trial registered on ANZCTR


Registration number
ACTRN12614000184673
Ethics application status
Approved
Date submitted
2/02/2014
Date registered
19/02/2014
Date last updated
27/04/2016
Type of registration
Prospectively registered

Titles & IDs
Public title
A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of a School-based Physical Activity Intervention in At-risk Communities: The Activity and Motivation in Physical Education (AMPED) Project
Scientific title
A Secondary School-based Professional Development Intervention for Teachers in At-risk Communities: Effect on Physical Activity Levels During Physical Education Lessons
Secondary ID [1] 283943 0
None
Universal Trial Number (UTN)
U1111-1152-6477
Trial acronym
Activity and Motivation in Physical Education (AMPED) Trial
Linked study record

Health condition
Health condition(s) or problem(s) studied:
Physical inactivity in secondary students 290956 0
Low physical activity participation in secondary students 291084 0
Condition category
Condition code
Physical Medicine / Rehabilitation 291346 291346 0 0
Other physical medicine / rehabilitation
Public Health 291428 291428 0 0
Health promotion/education

Intervention/exposure
Study type
Interventional
Description of intervention(s) / exposure
This trial will test the effect of a professional development intervention (the Adolescent Motivation in Physical Education intervention), targeting PE teachers. The intervention is based on the self-determination theory and is designed to increase students’ opportunities to engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity during PE lessons and to enhance their motivation to not only be physically active during PE lessons, but also during their leisure-time.
Over the main intervention period of 6 months, teachers will participate in 2 days of face-to-face workshops and complete two implementation tasks, involving self-reflection and feedback from a mentor. During the next 8 month follow-up period teachers will complete a half-day face-to-face workshop and complete an implementation task. Throughout the entire intervention period (main intervention plus follow-up period), teachers will also have access to online resources, including videos of best/poor practice and a discussion forum.
The face-to-face workshops will include presentations by members of the research team, videos of best/poor practice examples, self-reflection, group discussion, and opportunities for teachers to implement taught principles in simulated scenarios. The first workshop will be given at the very beginning of the main intervention period. The second workshop will occur 3 months after the first workshop. A final half day workshop will be provided in the follow-up period, 5 months after the end of the intervention.
From the beginning of the intervention to the end of the study, teachers in the intervention condition will have access to the project’s interactive website. The site will guide teachers through a series of three implementation tasks. The first task will require teachers to set an ‘action plan’ (i.e., goals) for implementation of strategies from the face-to-face training workshop into their lessons during the month following Workshop 1. During this period a video of a PE lesson taught by each teacher will be recorded and uploaded to the project website. Project staff will use an online coding system designed to identify specific instances of implementation attempts related to the action plan of principles taught during the face-to-face workshop. These instances will be condensed into a short video clip that will be uploaded to the project website. Teachers will use these clips to self-reflect on implementation.
Following self-reflection, each teacher will meet with one of three senior mentor teachers employed by the project. Each mentor meeting will last 30-45 minutes. These mentors will have at least 5 years of experience teaching PE and will have completed training designed to ensure in-depth understanding of intervention principles. The mentor teacher will have reviewed the video recording of the lesson and will facilitate a feedback conversation based on his/her viewing and knowledge of the teacher’s self-reflection. This conversation is the final step in the first implementation task. Mentors will then help teachers to set a new action plan. These actions plans will be implemented over the remainder of the term and will be reviewed at the start of Workshop 2 (beginning Term 3 2013). Implementation Task 2 will follow Workshop 2, with similar procedures followed (i.e., self-reflection, mentor meeting and new action plan).
In addition to facilitating teachers’ implementation tasks, the project website will provide teachers with resources designed to facilitate successful implantation of principles from the face-to-face workshops. The site will utilise a Web 2.0 platform that will allow for dynamic interaction between the teachers and the research team.
Adherence to the program will be assessed by recording and analysing: attendance at workshops; use of the online resources (e.g. number and duration of log-ons); completion of self-reflection tasks; attendance at mentorship meetings; and video recordings of the teachers PE lessons to identify the use of strategies that are encouraged in the intervention.
Intervention code [1] 288633 0
Lifestyle
Intervention code [2] 288634 0
Behaviour
Comparator / control treatment
Wait-list control. Whilst the intervention group receives the intervention, the control group will receive standard teaching.
Control group
Active

Outcomes
Primary outcome [1] 291299 0
Proportion of time students spend in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity during Physical Education lessons will be measured objectively using ActiGraph accelerometers (ActiGraph, LLC, Fort Walton Beach, FL).
Timepoint [1] 291299 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [1] 306454 0
Proportion of time students spend sedentary and in light, moderate and vigorous physical activity during Physical Education lessons measured objectively using ActiGraph accelerometers (ActiGraph, LLC, Fort Walton Beach, FL).
Timepoint [1] 306454 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [2] 306455 0
Student time spent in sedentary behaviour, light, moderate and vigorous physical activity during leisure-time measured objectively using ActiGraph accelerometers (ActiGraph, LLC, Fort Walton Beach, FL)
Timepoint [2] 306455 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [3] 306457 0
Student contextual and situational engagement during maths lessons will be measured using a questionnaire designed originally to measure school engagement (1), adapted to a maths setting (2).

(1) Fredricks, J.A., Blumenfeld, P., Friedel, J., Paris, A. (2005). School engagement. In K. A. Moore & L. Lippman (Eds.), Conceptualizing and measuring indicators of positive development: What do children need to flourish? New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Press.

(2) Hyde, C. (2009) The relationship between teacher assessment practices, student goal orientation and student engagement in elementary mathematics. Dissertation submitted to University of Southern California.
Timepoint [3] 306457 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [4] 306458 0
Student Global Self-concept will be measured using 21 items from the Physical Self Inventory (1).

(1) Morin, A.J.S., & Maïano, C. (2011). Validation of the short form of the physical self-inventory (PSI-S) using exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM). Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 12 (5), 540-554.
Timepoint [4] 306458 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [5] 306459 0
Student well-being will be measured using the 10-item Positive and Negative Affect Schedule for Children (1).

(1) Ebesutani, C., Regan, J., Smith, A., Reise, S., Higa-McMillan, C., Chorpita, B.F. (2012). The 10-item Positive and Negative Affect Schedule for Children, Child and Parent Shortened Versions: Application of Item Response Theory for more efficient assessment. Journal of Psychopathological Behaviour Assessment. 34, 191-203.
Timepoint [5] 306459 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [6] 306472 0
Autonomous and controlled motivation and amotivation towards Physical Education will be measured using the Perceived Locus of Causality Questionnaire adapted for Physical Education (1).

(1) Goudas, M., Biddle, S., Fox, K. (1994). Perceived locus of causality, goal orientations, and perceived competence in school physical education classes. British Journal of Educational Psychology. 64, 453-463).
Timepoint [6] 306472 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [7] 306473 0
Psychological needs satisfaction during PE lessons will be measured using items from: a scale measuring autonomy (1); the competence subscale from the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (2); and the acceptance subscale of the Need for Relatedness Scale (3).

(1) Standage, M., Duda, J.L., Ntoumanis, N. (2003). A model of contextual motivation in physical education: Using constructs and tenets from self-determination and goal perspective theories to predict leisure-time exercise intentions. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 97-110.

(2) McAuley, E., Duncan, T., Tammen, V.V. (1989). Psychometric properties of the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory in a competitive sport setting: A confirmatory factor analysis. Research quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 60, 48-58.

(3) Richer, S.F.,Vallerand, R.J. (1998). Construction et validation de l’ echelle du sentiment d’appartenance social (Construction and validation of the perceived relatedness scale). Revue Europeene de Psychologie Appliquee, 48, 129-137.
Timepoint [7] 306473 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [8] 306474 0
Stage of change in relation to leisure time physical activity will be measured using the Stages of Exercise Behaviour Change scale (1,2).

(1) Nigg, C. (2002). Physical activity assessment in population-based interventions: A stage approach. In G. Welk (Ed.), Physical activity assessments for health-related research (pp. 227-240).
Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics

(2) Hellsten, L. A., Nigg, C., Norman, G., Burbank, P., Braun, L., Breger, R., et al. (2008). Accumulation of behavioral validation evidence for physical activity stage of change. Health
Psychology, 27, S43-S53.
Timepoint [8] 306474 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [9] 306476 0
Student perceptions of the teacher to support them in PE will be measured using items from the Teacher as Social Context questionnaire (1).

(1) Belmont, M., Skinner, E., Wellborn, J., & Connell, J. (1992). Teacher as social context: A measure of student perceptions of teacher provision of involvement, structure and autonomy support. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester.
Timepoint [9] 306476 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [10] 306554 0
Student autonomous and controlled motivation, and amotivation towards leisure time moderate to vigorous physical activity will be measured using the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire version 2 (BREQ-2) (1).

(1) Markland, D., and Tobin, V. Modification to the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire to include an assessment of amotivation. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2004. 26: p. 191-196.
Timepoint [10] 306554 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [11] 306555 0
Autonomous and controlled motivation towards active travel to and from school will be measured using the Motivation for Active Travel to School Scale (MATSS), which is currently in development by our research team.
Timepoint [11] 306555 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [12] 306556 0
Time spent in active travel will be measured using an adapted version of the active travel questionnaire previously used in the Strathclyde Evaluation of Children's Activity Travel study (1).

(1) McMinn, D., Rowe, D.A., Murtagh, S., Nelson, N.M. (2011). The Strathclyde Evaluation of Children’s Activity Travel (SE-CAT): study rationale and methods. BMC Public Health, 11, 958
Timepoint [12] 306556 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [13] 306558 0
Student contextual maths self-concept will be measured using the Maths Self-Concept subscale from the Self Description Questionnaire (1).

(1) Marsh, H. (1992). Self Description Questionnaire–II: SDQ-II manual. University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Faculty of Education, Publication Unit.
Timepoint [13] 306558 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [14] 306559 0
Students perceptions of the PE teachers use of controlling behaviours will be measured using items adapted from the Negative Conditional Regards and Intimidation subscales of the Controlling Interpersonal Style Scale (1).

(1) Bartholomew, K.J., Ntoumanis, N., Thogersen-Ntoumani, C. (2010). The Controlling Interpersonal Style in a Coaching Context: Development and initial validation of a psychometric scale. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology. 32, 193-216.
Timepoint [14] 306559 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [15] 306577 0
Leisure time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity will also be measured subjectively using an adapted version of two versions of the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children questionnaire (1, 2).

(1) Rangul V, Holmen TL, Kurtze N, Cuypers K, Midthjell K. Reliability and validity of two frequently used self-administered physical activity questionnaires in adolescents. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 8, 47
(2) Prochaska, J.J., Sallis, J.F., Long, B. A physical activity measure for use with adolescents in primary care (2001). Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 155, 554-559.
Timepoint [15] 306577 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [16] 306592 0
Video analysis of student and teacher behaviour in Physical Education classes and student behaviour during maths classes will be conducted using momentary time sampling (1).

(1) Mahar, M, Murphy, S, Rowe, D, Golden, J, Shields, A, & Raedeke, T. (2006). Effects of a classroom-based program on physical activity and on-task behavior. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 38(12), 2086
Timepoint [16] 306592 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [17] 306666 0
Teacher perceptions of provision of autonomy, competence and relatedness support to students will be assessed using an adapted version of the Teacher as Social Context Questionnaire (1).

(1) Belmont, M., Skinner, E., Wellborn, J., & Connell, J. (1992). Teacher as social context: A measure of student perceptions of teacher provision of involvement, structure and autonomy support. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester.
Timepoint [17] 306666 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [18] 306667 0
Teacher perceptions of using controlling behaviour in their Physical Education lessons will be measured using the Negative Conditional Regards and Intimidation subscales of the Controlling Interpersonal Style Scale (1) adapted for teachers.

(1) Bartholomew, K.J., Ntoumanis, N., Thogersen-Ntoumani, C. (2010). The Controlling Interpersonal Style in a Coaching Context: Development and initial validation of a psychometric scale. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology. 32, 193-216.
Timepoint [18] 306667 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [19] 306668 0
Teacher self-determination to teach will be measured using an adapted version of the Motivation at Work Scale (1) and the Amotivation subscale from the Work Role Motivation Scale for School Principals (2).

(1) Gagne, M., Forest, J., Gilbert, M., Aube, C., Morin, E., Malorni, A. (2010). The Motivation at Work Scale: Validation Evidence in Two Languages. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 70 (4), 628-646.
(2) Fernet, C (2011). Development and validation of the Work Role Motivation Scale for School Principals (WRMS-SP). Educational Administration Quarterly, 47 (2), 308-331.
Timepoint [19] 306668 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [20] 306669 0
Teacher psychological needs thwarting will be measured using an adapted version of the Psychological Needs Thwarting Scale (1).

(1) Bartholomew, K.J., Ntoumanis, N., Ryan, R.M., Thogersen-Ntoumani, C. (2011). Psychological need thwarting in the sport context: Assessing the darker side of athletic experience. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 33, 75-102.
Timepoint [20] 306669 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [21] 306672 0
Student academic performance will be measured by collecting National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) scores from school records.
Timepoint [21] 306672 0
At baseline and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [22] 306673 0
Student participation rate in Physical Education lessons will be measured. The total number of students at each lesson, the number of students at each lesson that are not participating and the number of students absent from each lesson will be recorded.
Timepoint [22] 306673 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [23] 306674 0
Proportion of time teachers spend sedentary and in light, moderate and vigorous physical activity during Physical Education lessons measured objectively using ActiGraph accelerometers (ActiGraph, LLC, Fort Walton Beach, FL).
Timepoint [23] 306674 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [24] 306675 0
General autonomous and controlling motivational orientation will be assessed using the General Causality Orientations autonomous and controlling vignettes (1).

(1) Deci, E. L., & Ryan, R. M. (1985). The general causality orientations scale: Self-determination in personality. Journal of Research in Personality, 19, 109-134.
Timepoint [24] 306675 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [25] 306676 0
Teacher intention to implement the intervention will be measured using an adapted version of the Intentions to Exercise Scale (1). In addition, four items created by our team to measure ease of implementation, effectiveness and usefullness of the intervention will be administered to teachers.

(1) Chatzisarantis, N.L.D., Biddle, S.J.H., Meek, G.A. (1997). A self-determination theory approach to the study of intentions and the intention-behaviour relationship in children’s physical activity. British Journal of Health Psychology, 2, 343-360.
Timepoint [25] 306676 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [26] 306677 0
Teacher psychological job needs satisfaction will be measured using the Work-related Basic Need Satisfaction Scale (1).

(1) Van den Broeck, A., Vansteenkiste, M., De Witte, H., Soenens, B., Lens, W. (2010). Capturing autonomy, competence, and relatedness at work: Construction and initial validation of the Work-related Basic Need Satisfaction scale. Journal of Occupational and Organisational Psychology. 83, 981-1002.
Timepoint [26] 306677 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [27] 306678 0
Teacher burnout will be measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (1).

(1) Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS). Ref: Schutte, N., Toppinen, S., Kalimo, R., Schaufeli, W. (2000). The factorial validity of the Maslach Burnout Invventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) across occupational groups and nations. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. 73, 53-66.
Timepoint [27] 306678 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline
Secondary outcome [28] 306679 0
Teacher job satisfaction will be assessed using a 1-item questionnaire (1).

(1) Vansteenkiste, M., Neyrinck, B., Niemiec, P., Soenens, B., De Witte, H., Van den Broeck, A. (2007). Journal of Occupational and Organisational Psychology, 80, 251-277.
Timepoint [28] 306679 0
At baseline, 7-8 and 14-15 months post baseline

Eligibility
Key inclusion criteria
In order to participate in the study, schools will need to meet the following inclusion criteria: (1) Secondary school with students enrolled in Years 8 and 9; (2) Funded by the New South Wales Department of Education and Communities (DEC); (3) Located in the Western Sydney or Southwestern Sydney regions; (4) Located in a postcode with low socioeconomic status (SEIFA index of disadvantage < 6); and (5) Permission granted by the Principal, the Head of PE and at least one Year 8 PE teacher.
In order for students to participate in the study they must be enrolled in Year 8 PE classes in 2014 in a government-funded (Department of Education & Communities) secondary school in the Western Sydney region of New South Wales. In addition parental consent and student assent must be provided to participate in the study.
Minimum age
12 Years
Maximum age
15 Years
Gender
Both males and females
Can healthy volunteers participate?
Yes
Key exclusion criteria
Students that are unable to participate in PE lessons, who do not provide assent or do not receive parental consent will be excluded from the study.

Study design
Purpose of the study
Prevention
Allocation to intervention
Randomised controlled trial
Procedure for enrolling a subject and allocating the treatment (allocation concealment procedures)
This trial is a cluster randomized controlled trial. Principals and PE department heads from all 64 secondary schools that meet our eligibility criteria will be invited to express their interest in participating in this study. If more than 14 schools indicate an interest, we will purposely sample schools in order to ensure that the sample is representative of the population, in terms of school size and gender composition (i.e., single sex or co-educational). Schools that agree to participate will be match paired according to socio-economic status of the post code in which the school is located, school size (Year 8 enrolment), gender composition of Physical Education classes (i.e., single sex vs co-ed) and the duration of physical education lessons. Using a computer-based randomization plan generator, 14 schools will be randomized from within each pair following baseline assessments. Randomization will be carried out by a researcher not associated with the project. Students will be blinded to hypotheses and school allocation. Teachers will be aware of their allocation to intervention or control condition.
All PE teachers in schools that enter into the trial will be invited to an information session during which study procedures will be outlined and questions answered.
Once Principal and Physical Education teachers have provided consent, student assent and parent consent will be sought by written invitation handed out to students in class.
Methods used to generate the sequence in which subjects will be randomised (sequence generation)
A computer-based randomization plan generator will be used to generate the sequence in which schools will be randomised (14 schools will be randomized from within each pair following baseline assessments).
Masking / blinding
Blinded (masking used)
Who is / are masked / blinded?
The people receiving the treatment/s

The people assessing the outcomes
The people analysing the results/data
Intervention assignment
Parallel
Other design features
Wait-list control design (one group receives the intervention whilst the other group is a wait-list control)
Phase
Phase 2 / Phase 3
Type of endpoint(s)
Safety/efficacy
Statistical methods / analysis
Sample size calculations have been based on estimated effect sizes for the primary outcome. A recent meta-analysis indicated that Physical Education lesson planning and delivery interventions have shown a pooled effect of d = 0.60 on moderate to vigorous physical activity during Physical Education lessons. To ensure 80% power to detect an effect of this size would require 90 participants in a non-clustered trial (two-tailed probability level of 0.05). We considered the clustered nature of the data, including both school and class levels. However, results from a pilot study we conducted and a recent study of moderate to vigorous physical activity in Physical Education lessons indicated that clustering at the school level was negligible after accounting from clustering at the class level. As a result, we adjusted our sample size calculations for clustering using the formula 1+(m-1)ICC, where m is the number of students per class and ICC is the intra-class correlation.
A recent study that we conducted in schools from the Sydney area indicated a class level ICC of .55, whilst another recent and similar study reported a class level ICC of .63. We adopted a conservative approach, and adjusted based on the larger value. With an estimated class size of 22 participating students, an adjustment of 14.23 was required: 1+(22-1)0.63 = 14.23. Multiplying by the 90 participants required in a non-clustered trial, we estimated that 1280 students would need to participate to achieve 80% power. We estimated that 14 schools, with a mean of 4.5 classes of Year 8 students per school could be recruited in the specified time frame, and therefore aim to recruit 1386 students (14 schools x 4.5 classes per school x 22 students per class). Potential loss to follow up of up to 30% of participants (n=384; a very conservative estimate) would not substantially impact on the statistical power of the study. This is because this study will use generalized mixed models to estimate intervention effects with no and with multiple imputations, enabling the inclusion of all participants (included at baseline) in the analyses. The first type of analytical approach has been shown to lead to a decrease in power of ~3.5% following the loss of 30% of cases/data in non-clustered longitudinal clinical trials. The second approach generally leads to similar estimates, but may sometimes slightly increase power.

Between condition differences in changes on the primary and secondary outcomes will be analyzed according to intention to treat and per-protocol principles. Specifically, intention to treat analyses will involve analysis of outcomes collected from all students who completed baseline assessment, regardless of whether or not they complete follow-up 1 or 2 assessments.
Generalized linear mixed models, adjusting for class clustering, will be employed. Possible school-level residual clustering will be explored and included in the models, if appropriate. The effects of temperature at the start of each lesson and lesson activity type (categorical variable; e.g., invasion games vs striking and fielding games vs fitness activities) will be also be explored by adjusting for these variables in the models.
Generalized linear mixed models will be also used to examine mediation hypotheses. Mediating effects will be estimated using a cluster-bootstrapped based product-of-coefficients test that is appropriate for cluster randomized controlled trials.
Potential moderators of the intervention effects will also be explored. Potential moderators will include gender, ethnicity, and weight status (categorical variables), as well as socio-economic status and baseline levels of physical activity and psychosocial variables (e.g., motivation and needs satisfaction) which will be treated as continuous variables. Moderator effects will be explored using the same generalized mixed modeling approach by including appropriate interaction terms in the regression models. Significant interaction terms will be explored by testing differences in intervention effects across sub-groups stratified according to the moderator variable.
Per protocol analyses will investigate the influence of teachers’ adoption of the intervention, as indicated by the proportion of intervention components completed by each teacher, on student outcomes. These analyses will also examine the effect of teachers’ implementation of the intervention, as indicated by increases in their use of suggested strategies from baseline to follow-up (observed in video recordings of their lessons), on student outcomes. As with the aforementioned moderator analyses, the effect of teacher adoption and implementation on student outcomes will be explored using interaction terms, with follow-up stratified sub-group analyses, where appropriate.

Recruitment
Recruitment status
Completed
Date of first participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last data collection
Anticipated
Actual
Sample size
Target
Accrual to date
Final
Recruitment in Australia
Recruitment state(s)
NSW

Funding & Sponsors
Funding source category [1] 288579 0
Government body
Name [1] 288579 0
Australian Research Council
Address [1] 288579 0
Level 2, 11 Lancaster Place
Majura Park ACT 2609
AUSTRALIA

GPO Box 2702
CANBERRA
ACT 2601
AUSTRALIA
Country [1] 288579 0
Australia
Primary sponsor type
University
Name
University of Western Sydney
Address
Locked Bag 1797
Penrith
NSW 2751
Country
Australia
Secondary sponsor category [1] 287289 0
University
Name [1] 287289 0
The University of Newcastle
Address [1] 287289 0
University Dr
Callaghan
NSW
2308
Country [1] 287289 0
Australia
Secondary sponsor category [2] 287323 0
University
Name [2] 287323 0
The University of Sydney
Address [2] 287323 0
City Road
Darlington
NSW
2008
Country [2] 287323 0
Australia
Secondary sponsor category [3] 287324 0
University
Name [3] 287324 0
Deakin University
Address [3] 287324 0
221 Burwood Hwy
Burwood
Victoria
3125
Country [3] 287324 0
Australia

Ethics approval
Ethics application status
Approved
Ethics committee name [1] 290442 0
Student Engagement and Program Evaluation Bureau
Ethics committee address [1] 290442 0
Policy, Planning and Reporting Directorate, NSW Department of Education and Communities
Level 1
1 Oxford Street
Darlinghurst
NSW
2010
Ethics committee country [1] 290442 0
Australia
Date submitted for ethics approval [1] 290442 0
15/08/2013
Approval date [1] 290442 0
20/09/2013
Ethics approval number [1] 290442 0
2013162
Ethics committee name [2] 290443 0
University of Western Sydney
Ethics committee address [2] 290443 0
Human Research Ethics Committee
University of Western Sydney
Locked Bag 1797
Penrith NSW 2751
Ethics committee country [2] 290443 0
Australia
Date submitted for ethics approval [2] 290443 0
Approval date [2] 290443 0
Ethics approval number [2] 290443 0
H9171

Summary
Brief summary
Funded by the Australian Research Council, this study will test the effect of a professional development program targeting physical education teachers that is designed to increase students’ opportunities for physical activity during physical education lessons and to enhance their motivation towards physical activity.
This research is important because many Australian youth do not participate in sufficient physical activity and there is a large decline in physical activity associated with adolescence. As a result, there is an urgent need to develop strategies to engage adolescents in physical activity. If adolescent physical activity levels can be increased, a variety of benefits are expected, including engagement during academic classes, greater self-concept, and better overall well-being.
Trial website
Trial related presentations / publications
Public notes

Contacts
Principal investigator
Name 45698 0
A/Prof Chris Lonsdale
Address 45698 0
Institute for Positive Psychology and Education

Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University

25A Barker Road, Strathfield NSW 2135
Country 45698 0
Australia
Phone 45698 0
+61 2 9701 4642
Fax 45698 0
Email 45698 0
chris.lonsdale@acu.edu.au
Contact person for public queries
Name 45699 0
A/Prof Chris Lonsdale
Address 45699 0
Institute for Positive Psychology and Education

Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University

25A Barker Road, Strathfield NSW 2135
Country 45699 0
Australia
Phone 45699 0
+61 2 9701 4642
Fax 45699 0
Email 45699 0
chris.lonsdale@acu.edu.au
Contact person for scientific queries
Name 45700 0
A/Prof Chris Lonsdale
Address 45700 0
Institute for Positive Psychology and Education

Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University

25A Barker Road, Strathfield NSW 2135
Country 45700 0
Australia
Phone 45700 0
+61 2 9701 4642
Fax 45700 0
Email 45700 0
chris.lonsdale@acu.edu.au

No information has been provided regarding IPD availability
Summary results
Have study results been published in a peer-reviewed journal?
Other publications
Have study results been made publicly available in another format?
Results – basic reporting
Results – plain English summary