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Trial registered on ANZCTR


Registration number
ACTRN12618000322235
Ethics application status
Not required
Date submitted
7/02/2018
Date registered
5/03/2018
Date last updated
5/03/2018
Type of registration
Retrospectively registered

Titles & IDs
Public title
The relationship between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and alcoholic beverage consumption in Australian adults
Scientific title
The association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and alcoholic beverage consumption in Australian adults
Secondary ID [1] 293982 0
None
Universal Trial Number (UTN)
Trial acronym
Linked study record

Health condition
Health condition(s) or problem(s) studied:
obesity 306498 0
Condition category
Condition code
Diet and Nutrition 305603 305603 0 0
Obesity

Intervention/exposure
Study type
Observational
Patient registry
False
Target follow-up duration
Target follow-up type
Description of intervention(s) / exposure
The independent variable is the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage.

The intake data were obtained using a computer-assisted, multiple-pass 24-hour recall based on the Automated Multiple-Pass Method (AMPM) developed by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The recall was divided into five phases. In the first phase the respondents provided a quick account of what foods and drinks they consumed from mid-night to mid-night on the day prior to the interview. Next a series of questions were used to prompt the respondent for commonly forgotten items such as snacks. Then the respondents reported the time and eating occasion for each reported food. After that, detailed information of the food and drinks reported in the previous phases was collected. A final probe was performed before the end of the 24-hour recall to prompt for missing items for the last time.

Food and beverage items consumed by the participants were categorized into major food groups based on the key ingredients of the food by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. In this analysis, sugar-sweetened beverages included fruit drinks, cordial/mixer, soft drinks, energy drinks, and other sweetened beverages.
Intervention code [1] 300261 0
Not applicable
Comparator / control treatment
No control group
Control group
Uncontrolled

Outcomes
Primary outcome [1] 304728 0
The primary dependent variable is the alcoholic beverage intake.

The intake data were obtained using a computer-assisted, multiple-pass 24-hour recall based on the Automated Multiple-Pass Method (AMPM) developed by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The recall was divided into five phases. In the first phase the respondents provided a quick account of what drinks they consumed from mid-night to mid-night on the day prior to the interview. Next a series of questions were used to prompt the respondent for commonly forgotten items. Then the respondents reported the time and occasion for each reported intake items. After that, detailed information of drinks reported in the previous phases was collected. A final probe was performed before the end of the 24-hour recall to prompt for missing items for the last time.

Beverage items consumed by the participants were categorized into major food groups based on the key ingredients by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. In this analysis, alcoholic beverages included beers, wines, spirits, cocktails and liqueurs.
Timepoint [1] 304728 0
the total intake of alcoholic beverage in the 24 hours before the interview
Secondary outcome [1] 342943 0
Waist circumference.

It was measured by trained interviewers by holding the end of the tape at the appropriate point and asked the respondent to turn around until the tape met, or asked the respondent to hold the end of the tape and walked around them until the tape met.
Timepoint [1] 342943 0
at the day of interview, which occured between 29/5/2011 to 9/6/2012.

Eligibility
Key inclusion criteria
Usual residents of private dwellings in urban and rural areas of Australia, covering about 97% of the people living in Australia. Dietary data from those whose age was between 19 years old or above were included in this analysis.
Minimum age
19 Years
Maximum age
No limit
Gender
Both males and females
Can healthy volunteers participate?
Yes
Key exclusion criteria
Implausible dietary intake as determined by the Goldberg cut-off method, and respondents who did not consume any sugar-sweetened beverage or alcoholic beverage on the day of interview.

Study design
Purpose
Duration
Selection
Timing
Statistical methods / analysis

Recruitment
Recruitment status
Completed
Date of first participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last data collection
Anticipated
Actual
Sample size
Target
Accrual to date
Final
Recruitment in Australia
Recruitment state(s)
ACT,NSW,NT,QLD,SA,TAS,WA,VIC

Funding & Sponsors
Funding source category [1] 298613 0
Government body
Name [1] 298613 0
Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing
Address [1] 298613 0
Sirius Building, Furzer Street, Woden Town Centre, ACT 2606
Country [1] 298613 0
Australia
Primary sponsor type
Individual
Name
Dr. Jimmy Louie
Address
5S-14, Kadoorie Biological Sciences Bldg,
The University of Hong Kong,
1 Pokfulam Road,
Pokfulam
Country
Hong Kong
Secondary sponsor category [1] 297773 0
None
Name [1] 297773 0
Address [1] 297773 0
Country [1] 297773 0

Ethics approval
Ethics application status
Not required
Ethics committee name [1] 299572 0
Ethics committee address [1] 299572 0
Ethics committee country [1] 299572 0
Date submitted for ethics approval [1] 299572 0
Approval date [1] 299572 0
Ethics approval number [1] 299572 0

Summary
Brief summary
Excess consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) has been linked to obesity in adults. While efforts were made to reduce SSB consumption, there were concerns that this may lead to compensatory increase in consumption of other caloric nutrients, such as alcohol. This study aimed to assess the association between consumption of SSB and consumption of alcoholic beverage, as well as the effect of substituting SSB with alcoholic beverage on waist circumference.
Trial website
Trial related presentations / publications
Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016, Australian Health Survey: Consumption of added sugars, 2011-12 , cat. no. 4364.0.55.011, viewed 16 June 2016. URL: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4364.0.55.011main+features12011-12
Public notes
Ethics approval on the analysis regarding the association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and alcoholic beverage consumption was not required since it is a secondary analysis.

The primary data of this survey was from the Australian Health Survey (AHS) 2011-13. This survey was carried out by the Australian Bureau of Statistics and aimed at providing governments, health researchers and the community with important clues about health problems and emerging issues in Australia today.

For the detailed results, please visit: http://www.abs.gov.au/australianhealthsurvey

Contacts
Principal investigator
Name 80882 0
Dr Jimmy Chun Yu Louie
Address 80882 0
5S-14, Kadoorie Biological Sciences Building, The University of Hong Kong, 1 Pokfulam Road, Pokfulam.
Country 80882 0
Hong Kong
Phone 80882 0
+852 2299 0677
Fax 80882 0
Email 80882 0
jimmyl@hku.hk
Contact person for public queries
Name 80883 0
Dr Jimmy Chun Yu Louie
Address 80883 0
5S-14, Kadoorie Biological Sciences Building, The University of Hong Kong, 1 Pokfulam Road, Pokfulam.
Country 80883 0
Hong Kong
Phone 80883 0
+852 2299 0677
Fax 80883 0
Email 80883 0
jimmyl@hku.hk
Contact person for scientific queries
Name 80884 0
Dr Jimmy Chun Yu Louie
Address 80884 0
5S-14, Kadoorie Biological Sciences Building, The University of Hong Kong, 1 Pokfulam Road, Pokfulam.
Country 80884 0
Hong Kong
Phone 80884 0
+852 2299 0677
Fax 80884 0
Email 80884 0
jimmyl@hku.hk

No information has been provided regarding IPD availability
Summary results
Have study results been published in a peer-reviewed journal?
Other publications
Have study results been made publicly available in another format?
Results – basic reporting
Results – plain English summary