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Trial registered on ANZCTR


Registration number
ACTRN12613000326796
Ethics application status
Approved
Date submitted
20/03/2013
Date registered
25/03/2013
Date last updated
14/10/2015
Type of registration
Prospectively registered

Titles & IDs
Public title
Music therapy to support the wellbeing of young people with intellectual disability
Scientific title
A qualitative evaluation of a music therapy programme for young people with intellectual disability who are transitioning from school to work or other activity.
Secondary ID [1] 282152 0
None
Universal Trial Number (UTN)
U1111-1140-8205
Trial acronym
Linked study record

Health condition
Health condition(s) or problem(s) studied:
Intellectual disability 288658 0
Condition category
Condition code
Mental Health 289002 289002 0 0
Learning disabilities
Alternative and Complementary Medicine 289017 289017 0 0
Other alternative and complementary medicine

Intervention/exposure
Study type
Interventional
Description of intervention(s) / exposure
Participants will be invited to twenty therapeutic group music sessions (8-10 persons in the group), facilitated by two registered music therapists and supported by the lead researcher in her role as participant observer (also RMT), lasting up to 1.5 hours each. Four blocks of weekly sessions will be held between 2/9/13 and 4/10/13; 14/10/13 and 15/11/13; 25/11/13 and 20/12/13; and 27/1/14 and 7/3/14. The young people will be engaged in various forms of music activity according to their particular individual and collective interests and strengths. The primary goal will be to build a musical community through collaborative ‘musicking’ (Pavlicevic & Ansdell, 2004). Musicking involves active and collaborative participation which can lead to a culture of connectedness and the enhancement of mutual relationships (Stige, 2010). The participants themselves will determine the precise activities they will engage with, but they are likely to include listening, singing, song writing, playing musical instruments, and/or moving to music, as well as talking about music, about how music makes them feel, and what music reminds them of. They will be supported to participate and their varying abilities and styles of communication will be respected.
Intervention code [1] 286761 0
Other interventions
Comparator / control treatment
No control
Control group
Uncontrolled

Outcomes
Primary outcome [1] 289116 0
Improvement in overall well-being
Timepoint [1] 289116 0
We intend to involve the participants in action research. Each week they will negotiate what music they will do, why they want to do it, how they will do it, and how they will evaluate their activity. When they have evaluated their session they will plan the following one. Every five weeks, approximately, the three participating adults will analyse the data drawn from participant observation (of music and talking), and reflective journaling. The data will be subjected to thematic analysis. Each evaluation will constitute one cycle of learning. The adults will bring their new understandings back to the young people who will have the opportunity to discuss and renegotiate the findings and plan for the next cycle (four cycles in total). The adults will undertake a final analysis and meet with the young people to share and negotiate findings.
Primary outcome [2] 289117 0
The young people's concerns and desires will be communicated to their programme providers
Timepoint [2] 289117 0
We intend to involve the participants in action research. Each week they will negotiate what music they will do, why they want to do it, how they will do it, and how they will evaluate their activity. When they have evaluated their session they will plan the following one. Every five weeks, approximately, the three participating adults will analyse the data drawn from participant observation (of music and talking), and reflective journaling. The data will be subjected to thematic analysis. Each evaluation will constitute one cycle of learning. The adults will bring their new understandings back to the young people who will have the opportunity to discuss and renegotiate the findings and plan for the next cycle (four cycles in total). The adults will undertake a final analysis and meet with the young people to share and negotiate findings which will be forwarded to programme providers.
Secondary outcome [1] 301850 0
None
Timepoint [1] 301850 0
None

Eligibility
Key inclusion criteria
Participants will be enrolled in IHC New Zealand (full brand name) transition support programmes. They are New Zealand citizens or permanent residents currently living in New Zealand, aged between 16 and 21, funded by the Ministry of Education’s Ongoing Resource Scheme (ORS), in their final year of school.
Minimum age
16 Years
Maximum age
21 Years
Gender
Both males and females
Can healthy volunteers participate?
No
Key exclusion criteria
Not enrolled in IHC transition support programme

Study design
Purpose of the study
Educational / counselling / training
Allocation to intervention
Non-randomised trial
Procedure for enrolling a subject and allocating the treatment (allocation concealment procedures)
Methods used to generate the sequence in which subjects will be randomised (sequence generation)
Masking / blinding
Who is / are masked / blinded?



Intervention assignment
Other design features
Phase
Not Applicable
Type of endpoint(s)
Statistical methods / analysis

Recruitment
Recruitment status
Completed
Date of first participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last data collection
Anticipated
Actual
Sample size
Target
Accrual to date
Final
Recruitment outside Australia
Country [1] 4945 0
New Zealand
State/province [1] 4945 0
Wellington

Funding & Sponsors
Funding source category [1] 286921 0
Charities/Societies/Foundations
Name [1] 286921 0
IHC Foundation
Address [1] 286921 0
PO Box 4155,
Wellington 6140
Country [1] 286921 0
New Zealand
Funding source category [2] 286922 0
University
Name [2] 286922 0
New Zealand School of Music
Address [2] 286922 0
PO Box 2332,
Wellington 6410
Country [2] 286922 0
New Zealand
Primary sponsor type
University
Name
New Zealand School of Music
Address
New Zealand School of Music
Music Therapy Department
Mt Cook Campus
PO Box 2332
Wellington 6140
Country
New Zealand
Secondary sponsor category [1] 285709 0
Charities/Societies/Foundations
Name [1] 285709 0
IHC Foundation
Address [1] 285709 0
Jan Dowland
Executive Director
IHC Foundation
PO Box 4155
Wellington 6140
Country [1] 285709 0
New Zealand
Secondary sponsor category [2] 285710 0
University
Name [2] 285710 0
Massey University
Address [2] 285710 0
Ingrid Day
Pro Vice Chancellor
College of Health
Massey University Wellington
PO Box 756
Wellington
6140

Country [2] 285710 0
New Zealand

Ethics approval
Ethics application status
Approved
Ethics committee name [1] 288979 0
New Zealand Health and Disability Ethics Committee
Ethics committee address [1] 288979 0
Ministry of Health
No 1 The Terrace
PO Box 5013
Wellington, 6140
Ethics committee country [1] 288979 0
New Zealand
Date submitted for ethics approval [1] 288979 0
11/04/2013
Approval date [1] 288979 0
16/06/2013
Ethics approval number [1] 288979 0
13/NTA/74

Summary
Brief summary
We intend to engage a group of young people with intellectual disability who are transitioning from school, as co-researchers in an action research project to examine, develop, and describe the therapeutic potential of group music making with this population. The developmental period of transition from late adolescence to young adulthood is a time of significant change, bringing new opportunities coupled with uncertainties, challenges, and risks, all of which can be intensified for young people with disabilities. Music making is a nonverbal creative medium that is accessible to all, and it is a popular activity with young people. It promotes interaction and collaboration, and can support their efforts to develop individual mastery, independence, self-esteem, and autonomy, and to forge strong connections with each other and the wider community. Action research, like the community music therapy approach in which we will be grounding the work, is highly collaborative and empowering, and by its very nature will contribute to the self-determination that the young people will be seeking. Action research methodology is rarely used with this population, although it appears to be particularly enabling for young people. The young people who will be involved in the sessions are likely to experience improvement in overall wellbeing and to develop skills that that will increase their potential for self-advocacy and their prospects of engaging in other meaningful activity or work. Moreover the articulation of their aspirations and goals in various forms through the research process will inform service providers about what is needed to implement the best services now and into the future, for people of this age.
Trial website
Trial related presentations / publications
Rickson, D. (2014). The relevance of disability perspectives in music therapy practice with children and young people who have intellectual disability. Voices: A world forum for music therapy, 14 (3). (Special issue on music therapy and disability studies), online at https://voices.no/index.php/voices/article/view/784.
Rickson, D., Evans, A., Claydon, N. R., Dennis, P., Dovey, K., Francis, T. K., . . . Watkins, E. (2014). Active Music Research Project Poster Presentation at 'Moving On - Success in Transition Conference'. Wellington, NZ: ImagineBetter.
Rickson, D., Evans, A., Claydon, N. R., Dennis, P., Dovey, K., Francis, T. K., . . . Watkins, E. (2014). Active Music: Participatory Action Research about music for young people with intellectual disability. Paper presented at the Australian and New Zealand Association for Research in Music Education (ANZARME) conference 'Moving forward through research', Queenstown, NZ.
Rickson, D., Evans, A., Claydon, N. R., Dennis, P., Dovey, K., Francis, T. K., . . . Watkins, E. (2014). Active music. Massey Research Online: Massey University.

Public notes

Contacts
Principal investigator
Name 38618 0
Dr Daphne Rickson
Address 38618 0
Music Therapy Department
New Zealand School of Music
PO Box 2332
Wellington 6140
Country 38618 0
New Zealand
Phone 38618 0
+64272213145
Fax 38618 0
Email 38618 0
Daphne.Rickson@nzsm.ac.nz
Contact person for public queries
Name 38619 0
Dr Daphne Rickson
Address 38619 0
Music Therapy Department
New Zealand School of Music
PO Box 2332
Wellington 6140
Country 38619 0
New Zealand
Phone 38619 0
+64272213145
Fax 38619 0
Email 38619 0
Daphne.Rickson@nzsm.ac.nz
Contact person for scientific queries
Name 38620 0
Dr Daphne Rickson
Address 38620 0
Music Therapy Department
New Zealand School of Music
PO Box 2332
Wellington 6140
Country 38620 0
New Zealand
Phone 38620 0
+64272213145
Fax 38620 0
Email 38620 0
Daphne.Rickson@nzsm.ac.nz

No information has been provided regarding IPD availability
Summary results
Have study results been published in a peer-reviewed journal?
Other publications
Have study results been made publicly available in another format?
Results – basic reporting
Results – plain English summary